Reservist Careers

The 3rd Battalion The Royal Welsh is the only Reserve Army Infantry unit that recruits from the whole of Wales. The Battalion was formed on 1st March 2006 in Cardiff.

Previously, the Battalion was known as The Royal Welsh Regiment which formed on the 1st July 1999 when the 3rd (Volunteer) Battalion, Royal Welch Fusiliers and the 2nd (Volunteer) Battalion, Royal Regiment of Wales were amalgamated at Otterburn Camp, Nothumberland.

With the headquarters in Maindy Barracks Cardiff, the 3rd Battalion has Machine Gun,rifle and Assault Pioneersbased in Wrexham, Patrols and Assault Pioneers in Colwyn Bay, Mortars and Rifles in Pontypridd and Anti Tank Platoon in Swansea. The Band of The Royal Welsh together with the Corps of Drums (South) is based in Newport, with the Corps of Drums (North) based in Wrexham.

There are officers and soldiers of the 3rd Battalion currently serving on operational tours in Afganistan, Canada, Bosnia and most recently in Iraq on Op TELIC. 

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So, how do I join The Royal Welsh as a Reservist?

These are the steps it takes to join the Royal Welsh as a Reservist.

As a Reserve Officer

Getting Started

Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application. (There’s a ‘save’ functionality so you don’t have to do it all at once.) If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to an Army Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.

Interview

If you're medically fit, you'll get a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) to support you.
You will be expected to contact or visit a Reserve unit and decide which one you would like to join. If you need help with this, your CSM can help you. Once you have decided on a suitable Unit, you will be invited for a Unit interview. This lets you ask questions and allows the unit’s recruiting team to see if you are suitable for the Army Reserve. This is important because it also allows you to ensure that the unit is right for you
After your interview you will need to fill out your medical declaration (RGMD), this is handed to your GP, and Optician (if needed).

Assessment

If you meet eligibility requirements and have completed any training and development set by your unit, you’ll be invited to spend 2 days at an Assessment Centre. Here, you’ll do physical and mental tests to judge your fitness and military potential, plus have a medical examination.

After you've completed your pre-employment checks (you will be given guidance on these), the next step in officer assessment is at the Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB). This is in two parts: a 24-hour briefing and a 3½ day Main Selection Board:

24-hour briefing (over a 2 day period)
At the briefing you'll undertake physical and practical exercises designed to test your leadership and teamwork potential. This is your chance to learn and prepare for the next step, Main Board selection. The AOSB prep document will help you get ready for this.

Main Board
Once you pass AOSB Briefing you will be asked back to attend Main Board. Over a 3½ day period you’ll be assessed physically and mentally to demonstrate your abilities.

You'll then start officer training at a local Officer Training Corps – this will be agreed between your Unit and the OTC to optimise the time you will now spend undertaking officer training.

Training

You can complete your officer training in modules or in one go depending on your circumstances. Both options will see you receive your commission on completion of your training at Sandhurst.

Leadership skills

Initial officer training is a series of modules to develop your military, leadership and tactical skills teaching you the same skills as Regular Army officers. Each of the first 2 modules are either broken up into 7 weekends with an Officer Training Corps or each done as a consolidated 2 week module at Sandhurst. The third module, also lasts for 2 weeks and takes place at Sandhurst.

Commissioning Course

The fourth module is the Reserve Commissioning Course at Sandhurst, which is considered to be the culmination of your leadership and management training. The 2 week course is designed to further develop your leadership ability and give you the key military skills required to have a successful Reserve career. All four modules are run back-to-back at Sandhurst, allowing you to complete all of your Reserve Officer training in a single eight week package, if appropriate. The course ends with a, formal Commissioning Parade in front of Old College to which family and friends are invited.

As a Reserve Soldier

Getting Started

Use In Your Area to find out what local units may be available for you to join, as well as role finder to help you choose what roles may be suitable for you. You will need to check with your preferred unit what roles they have available. Create an online account so you can fill in and submit your application (it should only take a couple of minutes). If you have any questions at all, chat to our Advisers on Live Chat or pop in to an Army Careers Centre.
Once your application has been received and your basic eligibility assessed, you’ll be sent a link to complete an online form about your general health.

Face to Face

If you’re medically fit you will be assigned to a Candidate Support Manager (CSM) who will guide you through the recruitment process. At this stage you will also be invited to a Face to Face chat at your chosen and most suitable unit. This lets you ask questions and allows the unit’s recruiting team to see if you are suitable for the Army Reserve. This is important because it also allows you to ensure that the unit is right for you. If you have not yet chosen a job preference the unit will be able to tell you about what is available to you.
The recruiting team will identify what training and development you require to be ready for the next stage of the application process.

Assessment

If you meet eligibility requirements and have completed your training and development set by your unit, you’ll be invited to spend 2 days at the Assessment Centre.
Here, you’ll do physical and mental tests to judge your fitness and soldier potential, plus have a medical examination. If you pass and have taken all the required documentation with you, you’ll be offered the chance to enlist into the Army Reserves.
You'll need to complete pre-employment checks, which involve filling out security forms and completing final medical checks which involve your Doctor sending us information about your medical background.

Training

Once you have been enlisted and your medical checks have been completed you will be booked to start your initial training to learn the basic soldier skills.
You don’t have to do all the training at once. It can be completed in shorter modules or in one go. Further training also takes place in your spare time. It can take weeks or months depending on your role, course and how much time you can give.
Drill nights at your unit will allow them to give you advice and support.

RHQ The Royal Welsh 

Maindy Barracks, Cardiff, CF14 3YE

THE ROYAL WELSH

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